ART ITINERARY ARTICLE by Andy DelGuidice

By Andy DelGiudice

 Glenn Kaino piece titlted "Bridge".

Glenn Kaino piece titlted "Bridge".

Saturday marked the launch of of the 2nd running off the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities (DCCAH) 5×5, a multidisciplinary project that tasks 5 Curators with establishing public art installations throughout Washington DC. The curators bring 5 individual pieces to fruition and they can each work with any number artists in an unlimited number of mediums to execute each installation. Four of the five curators chose to complete their installations in areas around the city, inviting the public to not only consider the pieces in their immediate everyday surrounds but to also traverse the city and explore areas that they might not normally encounter.

 "Bridge" by Glenn Kaino.

"Bridge" by Glenn Kaino.

The DCCAH organized an abbreviated media tour on Saturday and gave attendees a glimpse of two or three of the installations organized by each curator. It was interesting to consider the narratives established by each curator and hear from them directly on how the collaboration with their selected artists, the DCCAH, the District government, and various neighborhoods brought their ideas to fruition. It was almost overwhelming to try to take in so many pieces located throughout the District in such a short amount of time, but most of the works will be in place throughout October to December and are free to the public, with an emphasis on experiencing the 5×5 project and it’s diverse scope of work on a first hand basis.

 Photo From Brightest Young Things article of Nora Naranjo Morse Digging.

Photo From Brightest Young Things article of Nora Naranjo Morse Digging.

Curator Shamin M. Momin titled her city-wide campaign Alter/Abolish/Address and each of her chosen artists push the viewer to consider their environment, personal background, role and impact on a number of social issues permeating through society. Our first top on the tour was to the striking “Bridge”, a collection of 200 replicas of famed United States Olympian Tommie Smith’s fist of protest, assembled by Glenn Kaino in an abandoned Navy Yard warehouse.  


To read the full article visit:

http://brightestyoungthings.com/articles/art-itinerary-5x5.htm